Táncsics Mihály utca (Táncsics Mihály Street)

Táncsics Mihály street, 1890sIt is a curvilinear street between Bécsi kapu tér (Viennese Gate Square) and Hess András Square at the northeastern side of the town. The section which forms part of today's Hess András Square and stretches out as far as Nagyboldogasszony (Church of Our Lady) Church, also used to be part of the street during the Middle Ages. From the 13th century onwards the street was named after Szent Miklós (Saint Michael) monastery that used to stand at the eastern side. Written sources later often refer to the southwestern part of the street as Ötvös (Goldsmith) Street, while the property that was located on the north was sometimes considered as part of the Saturday market place. 

At the eastern side of the fault line (number 7-9-11 today) most probably a building complex belonging to royal property used to stand from as early as the town's founding. Medieval sources refer to it as Kammarhof or Magna Curia Regis, which in 1382 was donated to the Pauline Order by King Lajos the Great. From the middle of the 14th century, a chapel for the king consecrated in the honour of Saint Martin and another for the queen also used to stand on this site, which explains the street's name being referred to as Szent Márton Street in many historical documents. 

Táncsics Mihály street towards the Bécsi Gates square, 1890sIt is a curvilinear street between Bécsi kapu tér (Viennese Gate Square) and Hess András Square at the northeastern side of the town. The section which forms part of today's Hess András Square and stretches out as far as Nagyboldogasszony (Church of Our Lady) Church, also used to be part of the street during the Middle Ages. From the 13th century onwards the street was named after Szent Miklós (Saint Michael) monastery that used to stand at the eastern side. Written sources later often refer to the southwestern part of the street as Ötvös (Goldsmith) Street, while the property that was located on the north was sometimes considered as part of the Saturday market place. 

At the eastern side of the fault line (number 7-9-11 today) most probably a building complex belonging to royal property used to stand from as early as the town's founding. Medieval sources refer to it as Kammarhof or Magna Curia Regis, which in 1382 was donated to the Pauline Order by King Lajos the Great. From the middle of the 14th century, a chapel for the king consecrated in the honour of Saint Martin and another for the queen also used to stand on this site, which explains the street's name being referred to as Szent Márton Street in many historical documents. 

Táncsics Mihály street, During the 18th century it was referred to as Josephi Gasse, named after St. Josephi Bastion (previously Transylvanian Bastion) and after the arsenal that used to stand at the back of the property. The street's name changed several times during the 19th century (Consilium-, Kammer-, Todten-, Wiener-, Wienerthor Gasse). The military arsenal was also used as a prison during this period, Lajos Kossuth and Mihály Táncsics the famous characters of the 1848 Revolution were imprisoned here. In 1848 therefore the street for a short while was named Kossuth Lajos Street, after 1849 it was referred to as Wienerthor Gasse. From 1847 it was named Werboczy Street right until 1948, when it finally became Táncsics Mihály Street.